Halifax Area

Point Pleasant Park

Open year-round, Point Pleasant Park is located just south of Halifax’s downtown core and is the most easily accessible, longer hike if you live downtown. The perimeter or coastal loop is 3.36km, but the park itself is 185 acres – there’s a myriad of other trails snaking in and out of the trees. You’re allowed to bike, but only Mondays to Fridays and strictly on the gravel trails. There is cell phone service if necessary, and several washrooms provided.  This trail is wheelchair accessible.

There are two parking lot entrances to the park: one at the end of Tower Road-known as the upper lot, and one at the end of Point Pleasant Drive, the lower lot.

Directions: Bus route #9 gets you to the lower parking lot, at the end of Point Pleasant Drive.

Mainland North Linear Parkway

This wheelchair accessible trail cuts through the Clayton Park area, running from Kearney Lake Road near Wedgewood to Main Avenue in Fairview. It’s finished with crusher dust, which makes the trail suitable for both hiking and biking.

Although the trail begins and finishes on Kearney Lake Road and Main Avenue, it’s easier to find the a trail head if you go to the Keshen Goodman Library on Lacewood Drive and start from behind the building. There are many trail openings to different sections of the suburbs – once you’ve gone the first time you can decide what route’s best for you.

Directions: Route #2 or #4 both regularly stop at the Lacewood Terminal, where you take a left up Lacewood Drive until you reach the library on the left-hand side. Routes #17, #18, #21 and #52 also service the same terminal, and the #52 and #21 go straight up Lacewood Drive, past the library.

Whopper Dropper

The Whopper Dropper takes its name firstly, because it begins behind the Burger King in Bayers Lake and secondly, for being a challenging mountain bike trail. Although it is well known for its mountain biking, the mostly granite trail is certainly open for hikers. It connects with other trails along the way so you can choose shorter or longer hikes.  The Whopper Dropper should only be biked if you’re experienced at mountain biking and don’t mind a challenge. It is not wheelchair accessible.

Directions: Take the #52 or #21 to Bayers Lake. Get off when you see the Burger King. Walk until you reach the woods behind the fast-food restaurant. From there, you will see the start of the trail.

Source: The Trail Shop.

Cole Harbour/Dartmouth area

Salt Marsh Trail

Salt Marsh is an easy-to-navigate trail.  It is 6.5km long, and takes about three to four hours to complete, round trip.  You have to backtrack to exit the trail. It’s part of a repossessed rail line that’s part of the Trans Canada Trail. It  has crusher dust for footing, which makes it great for hiking, and biking, or pushing a stroller. There is cell phone service if necessary, and washrooms. This trail is not wheelchair accessible.

Directions: The trail is located at 806 Bissett Road, the Cole Harbour Heritage Park Trail head. Parking is available. Bus routes #59or #60 get you closest to the trail. then, you will have to walk to the trail head.

For more information visit the Halfiax Regional Municipality's Recreation section online and The Trail Shop.

Cole Harbour Heritage Park

This is a loop trail that’s 22km long and is designated as part of the Trans Canada Trail. There are various routes you can take, making for short hikes or day hikes. Most of the trails have crusher dust, but some smaller trails have woodchips as footing. There is cell phone service and washrooms. This trail is great for walking, hiking, or biking.  It is wheelchair accessible.

Directions: The trail is at 806 Bissett Road - Salt Marsh Trail head. Parking is available. Bus routes #59 and #60 will get you the closest to the trail. You will have to walk to the trail head.

For more information visit theHalfiax Regional Municipality's Recreation section online.

St. Margaret’s Bay area

Beechville Lakeside Timberlea (BLT) Trail

This is a rail trail – a repossessed rail line – that is great for hiking. It is 13kmlong and doesn’t make a loop; it should take you about five hours to complete the trail from the parking lot, to the end of the trail, and back. There are picnic tables and shelters along the way, biking is allowed and there’s cell phone service.  There are no washrooms. This trail is wheelchair accessible.

Directions: The trail is next to the Coca Cola Plant on Lakeside Drive in the Lakeside Industrial Park. Get on bus route #21 and ask the bus driver for Lakeside Industrial Park stop at Lakeside Drive.

For more information visit the Halfiax Regional Municipality's Recreation section online.

Herring Cove/Purcells Cove area

Frog Pond Trail

This is a nice and easy trail  if you’re looking for a short break. It is 1.4km long and takes about half an hour to hike. There are no washrooms but there is cell phone service. Bikes are not permitted on this trail. It is not wheelchair accessible.

Directions: It is located 2.2km after the Herring Cove Road and Purcells Cove Road intersection. Parking is available. Take the #15 bus to the stop at the Purcells Cove Road and Parkhill Drive intersection, 145m after the Frog Pond parking lot. If in doubt, find the Frog Pond (the only large pond you’ll find on the left-hand side of Purcells Cove Road when driving away from the city) – you’re bound to find the trail if you stick to the pond.

For more information visit the Halfiax Regional Municipality's Recreation section online.

Sir Sanford Fleming Park Trail

This well-maintained trail connects with the Frog Pond trail, allowing for a longer hike. It can accomodate sturdy strollers, as well as the average hiker.  You can drop by the Dingle Tower and learn a bit of history along the way. The trail is not wheelchair accessible.

Directions: The trail is located in Sir Sanford Fleming Park, on Purcells Cove Road. Take the #15 bus from Mumford Terminal. Get off shortly after the rotary when you see the park on the left-hand side. Get off the bus soon after you go through the rotary. The park is across the street on the left-hand side.

York Redoubt Trails

York Redoubt is a 200-year-old fortification that’s well-maintained by the government – but often the York Redoubt Trail is overlooked. Take a close peek at the map of the fortification as you walk into the site, and you’ll discover a coastal trail that is also well-maintained. Teh trail offers a great view of the harbour. This trail is not wheelchair accessible.

Directions: York Redoubt National Historic Site is on Purcells Cove Road. York Redoubt is the last stop on the bus route for the #15. Check the schedule with  Metro Transit before you go. The bus often only runs once every hour.

Where get more information:

Visit the Halifax Regional Municipality Recreation web site at www.halifax.ca/rec/.

Metro Transit Schedules are available online at www.halifax.ca/metrotransit/Schedules/index.asp .

Hiking clubs:

Halifax Trail Runners offers a hiking pace for everyone. Contact Rob Chambers or Steve Malley at The Trail Shop for more info. Call 423-8736

In winter, hiking is still a great way to stay active. Contact Take the Roof Off Winter for information on their activities. visit them online at www.taketheroofoffwinter.ca/index.php or call 425-1198.

The mandate of the Chebucto Hiking Club is " to introduce people to great hiking trails and natural footpaths in and around the Halifax Regional Municipality." Visit them online at chc.chebucto.org/ .

Hiking shops (to get gear and info):

The Trail Shop is located on Quinpool Road. 423-8736.

Mountain Equipment Coop is located on Granville Street. MEC has an online gear swap for cheaper hiking gear options, and an in-person gear swap on announced dates throughout the year. Visit them online at www.mec.ca or call 421-2667.

The Adventure Outfitters is on Salter Street in downtown Halifax. Call 481-9826.